10 Common Household Ants – The Creeping Terrors

There are nearly 800 different ant species in the US. However, only a handful of them are house pests.

Most ants are social insects, and they collectively invade homes to damage homes, contaminate food, and cause food-borne diseases such as E. coli, Shigella, and Salmonella.

In this ultimate common household ants guide, you’ll find out what these ants look like, where they come from, and the laser-focused hacks to control ants.

Let’s dive right in.

Odorous House Ants

The odorous house ants, scientifically known as Tapinoma sessile, emit an odor like rotten coconut if you crush them.

Odorous house ants - common household ants

Size

  • Length: Odorous house ants are relatively small, typically measuring about 1/16 to 1/8 inches (approximately 1.5 to 3 mm) in length.

Shape

  • Body Structure: They have a smooth, oval-shaped body with a somewhat uneven thorax when viewed from the side. Unlike some other ant species, they do not have spines on their backs.
  • Antennae: They possess 12-segmented antennae with no club.
  • Node: Their petiole, the connector between the thorax and abdomen, has a single, hidden node.

Color

  • Appearance: They are typically dark brown to black, giving them a rather bland appearance that blends easily into natural and urban environments.

Origin and Habitat

  • Origins: This species is native to North America.
  • Habitat Preferences: They are highly adaptable and can thrive in various environments, ranging from natural wooded areas to urban settings.

Activity Patterns

  • Most Active: They are most active during the warmer months, particularly spring and summer. However, if they nest indoors, they can remain active year-round.
  • Foraging Behavior: Odorous house ants have relentless foraging habits and can travel significant distances searching for food.

Nesting and Colonization

  • Nesting Sites: Indoors, they prefer to nest in warm, moist areas. Common nesting sites include near water sources, such as wall voids near hot water pipes or heaters, under sinks, and inside wood damaged by termites or moisture.
  • Colonies: Colonies can range from a few hundred to several thousand ants. They can also establish multiple sub-colonies with numerous queens, enabling rapid growth and spread.

The odorous house ant feeds on sugary foods and dead insects inside the house. These ants become a nuisance in homes as they forage for food and look for nesting areas.

Their ability to establish multiple sub-colonies makes them exceptionally resilient to elimination efforts, requiring thorough and sustained pest control measures.

Carpenter Ants

Carpenter ants, scientifically known as Camponotus, damage wooden structures to build colonies and lay eggs in them.

These ants pose a significant threat to wooden structures, and a severe carpenter ant infestation, just like a termite infestation, can put the house’s structural integrity at risk.

Carpenter ant colony in the house

Size

  • Length: Carpenter ants are among the larger species of ants, with worker ants typically measuring between 1/4 to 1/2 inch (6 to 12 mm). The queen ant is bigger than the worker ants. She grows up to 1 inch (25 mm).

Shape

  • Body Structure: They have a robust, oval-shaped body with a clearly defined, rounded thorax when viewed from the side.
  • Antennae: Their elbow-like antennae have 12 segments without a distinct club.
  • Node: They have a single, smooth, rounded petiole (the connector between the thorax and abdomen).

Color

  • Appearance: Carpenter ants vary in color, ranging from black to reddish-brown or even yellowish.

Origin and Habitat

  • Origins: They are found worldwide, with a significant presence in temperate and tropical regions.
  • Habitat Preferences: They prefer moist, decaying, or hollow wood for nesting. They are commonly found in forest environments but are also a significant pest in urban and suburban areas.

Activity Patterns

  • Most Active: Carpenter ants are primarily nocturnal, with peak activity during the night.
  • Foraging Behavior: They forage for food along well-defined ant trails, often covering significant distances from their nests.

Nesting and Colonization

  • Nesting Sites: In nature, they nest in dead, damp wood in trees, tree limbs, or stumps. In human homes, their nesting sites are wet wooden structures, window frames, windowsills, door frames, or wooden pieces that other insects, such as termites, have already damaged.
  • Colonies: A single colony can contain thousands of workers, but it takes several years to reach this size. They often establish satellite colonies separate from the central nest.

Identifying Features

  • Wood Damage: Unlike termites, carpenter ants do not eat wood but excavate it to create tunnels and chambers for their nests. Fine wood shavings mixed with parts of dead ants are a telltale sign of an active carpenter ants nest.
  • Noise: In quiet conditions, the activity within their nests can sometimes be audible as a faint rustling sound in walls or wooden structures.

Carpenter ants feed on honeydew producing insects and dead insects outdoors.

Indoors, their primary food source is food waste in the kitchen. But they also feed on live and dead insects and sweet foods.

Carpenter ant nests can be hard to detect in the house, and the size of worker ants varies. The queen ants in the nest sites are the biggest.

Effective control of carpenter ant infestations often involves locating and eliminating the main and satellite colonies and killing the multiple queen ants in these colonies.

It can be a challenging task due to their preference for inaccessible spaces.

Regular ant inspection and maintenance to prevent moisture accumulation in wood are critical preventive measures against these pests.

Carpenter ants disappear in the winter months. This is a behavior that most house ants show.

Ants don’t die off during the winter. They become dormant and retreat to their active nests in the house, only to show up again when spring arrives.

Pavement Ants

Pavement ants, known as Tetramorium caespitum, are common ant species in urban and suburban areas. These ants nest in and around the concrete pavements.

Pavement Ants In the House
Source – Wikipedia Commons

Size

  • Length: Pavement ants are tiny, typically measuring about 1/8 inch (around 3 mm) in length.

Shape

  • Body Structure: They have a segmented, oval-shaped body with a distinct head, thorax, and abdomen.
  • Antennae: Their antennae consist of 12 segments and end in a 3-segmented club.
  • Node: They have two nodes on their petiole, which is noticeable when viewed from the side.

Color

  • Appearance: Pavement ants are little black ants but can also be dark brown.

Origin and Habitat

  • Origins: They originated in Europe and are now widespread in North America and other regions.
  • Habitat Preferences: As their name suggests, you find them under and around pavement, such as sidewalks, driveways, and foundations. They also inhabit lawns and gardens.

Activity Patterns

  • Most Active: These ants are most active during the warmer months, especially in the late spring and early summer.
  • Foraging Behavior: Pavement ants are opportunistic feeders and will consume a wide variety of foods. They often enter homes in search of food, following trails they establish.

Nesting and Colonization

  • Nesting Sites: Their nests are under stones, pavements, and along the edges of the building’s foundations. You can identify their nests by small ant mounds of dirt or sand, which they bring to the surface when constructing or expanding their nests.
  • Colonies: Pavement ant colonies can range in size from a few thousand to over 10,000 workers. They are less aggressive than other ant species but will fight to defend their territory.

Identifying Features

  • Trail Formation: A key characteristic is their tendency to form well-defined foraging ant trails, which lead from their nests to food sources.
  • Swarming: Winged reproductive ants, or alates, typically swarm from late spring to midsummer, often after rainfall. These winged ants or flying ants emerge from cracks in pavements or sidewalks.

Pavement ants are more of a nuisance than a destructive pest. They can be persistent and difficult to control once they establish a foothold.

They are attracted to various food sources, including sweets, proteins, and greasy foods, often leading them into homes and other buildings.

Effective control measures include sealing entry points, removing food sources, and using bait stations or other ant control products.

Strategic placement of ant baits is essential so that the worker ants carr

Regular inspection and maintenance of pavements and building foundations can also help prevent pavement ant infestations.

Fire Ants – The Venomous Ant Species

Fire ants are infamous for their painful bites and stings. And it’s the only venomous ant species you should avoid.

Fire ants belong to the genus Solenopsis, which includes the red imported fire ants (Solenopsis invicta).

Red fire ants

Size

  • Length: Fire ants vary in size within their colonies but generally range from 1/16 to 1/4 inch (1.6 to 6 mm).

Shape

  • Body Structure: They have a segmented, oval-shaped body with a distinct head, thorax, and abdomen.
  • Antennae: Their antennae comprise 10 segments and end in a 2-segmented club.
  • Node: They have two nodes on their petiole, visible when viewed from the side.

Color

  • Appearance: Color varies by species but generally ranges from reddish-brown to dark brown.

Origin and Habitat

  • Origins: Some species, like the Red Imported Fire Ant, are native to South America but have become invasive in other regions, including the United States.
  • Habitat Preferences: They prefer warm, sunny conditions. They live and nest in lawns, parks, fields, and meadows.

Activity Patterns

  • Most Active: Fire ants are most active during warmer months. In cooler temperatures, they tend to stay underground.
  • Foraging Behavior: They are aggressive foragers, often traveling far from their nest to seek food.

Nesting and Colonization

  • Nesting Sites: The fire ant nest is a large ant mound with no crater or openings. Fire ants build their nests in open, sunny areas. They can also nest under objects on the ground, such as logs or rocks.
  • Colonies: Colonies can be large, with tens of thousands of ants, including multiple queens in some species, allowing for rapid expansion and establishment of new colonies.

Fire ants primarily nest outdoors but occasionally build an indoor nest, too.

Indoors, fire ants build their nests in areas like –

  1. Moist Areas: Like many ant species, fire ants seek out moisture. They might nest near water sources in a home, such as in bathrooms, near kitchen sinks, or around water heaters.
  2. Wall Voids and Electrical Boxes: They can enter wall cavities, especially if the walls have a moisture problem. Electrical outlets and utility sections can also attract them due to the warmth these areas provide.
  3. Under Floors: Fire ants can nest underneath flooring, especially in homes with a slab construction where heat and moisture might accumulate.
  4. Potted Plants: If you bring outdoor plants indoors, fire ants may nest in the moist soil of the potted plants.
  5. Near Food Sources: Places with pet food or human food also draw fire ants. However, this is rare as they prefer proteins and fats over sweets and carbohydrates.

Identifying Features

  • Sting: Many house ants can bite but the fire ants are known for their painful sting, which can cause a burning sensation, hence the name “fire” ants. The sting often results in an abscess or a raised red bump.
  • Aggression: They are very aggressive when disturbed and can sting repeatedly.

Fire ant’s presence can impact outdoor activities and pose a health threat, particularly to individuals allergic to their venom.

Fire ants, and many ants that live outdoors, can end up your swimming pool. These ants in the pool will bite if they’re pressed against your skin.

Control measures often include using ant baits, dish soap spray, and destroying the entire ant colony.

However, complete eradication is difficult, especially in areas where they are well-established.

If fire ant colonies are indoors, it’s often a sign of a larger outdoor settlement nearby.

Fire ant control strategies typically focus on reducing the number and size of colonies to minimize their impact.

Eradication of indoor fire ants involves:

  • Identifying and treating outdoor nests.
  • Sealing entry points to prevent ants from entering.
  • Maintaining a dry, clean, and food-crumbs-free indoor environment.

Always hire a pest control professional to eliminate fire ant nests outdoors and indoors.

Argentine Ants

Argentine ants, with the scientific name Linepithema humile, build massive ant colonies, and they’re common ants in urban and suburban homes.

Argentine Ants

Size

  • Length: Argentine ants are relatively small, typically measuring about 1/16 to 1/4 inch (2 to 6 mm) in length.

Shape

  • Body Structure: They have a smooth, oval-shaped body with a clearly defined head, thorax, and abdomen.
  • Antennae: Their antennae consist of 12 segments without a distinct club.
  • Node: They have a single node on their petiole, less visible than other ant species.

Color

  • Appearance: Argentine ants are usually light to dark brown.

Origin and Habitat

  • Origins: Native to South America, these ants have become a widespread invasive species in many parts of the world, including North America, Europe, Asia, Australia, and Africa.
  • Habitat Preferences: They thrive in urban areas and live in moist environments. They often nest in soil, under stones, at the base of trees, or along sidewalks and trails.

Activity Patterns

  • Most Active: Argentine ants are most active during warmer months but can be active year-round in warmer climates.
  • Foraging Behavior: They are known for forming long foraging trails and can travel great distances from their nest in search of food.

Nesting and Colonization

  • Nesting Sites: Indoors, they prefer to nest in damp areas, such as in wall voids, near water pipes, or in potted plants. Outdoors, they often create shallow nests in the soil.
  • Colonies: Argentine ant colonies can be enormous, with thousands to millions of individuals and multiple queens, allowing for rapid population growth. They are also known for their ability to form ‘super colonies,’ with interconnected nests over large areas.

Identifying Features

  • Trail Formation: They form conspicuous ant trails that you can easily follow to locate their nests or entry points.
  • Odor: When crushed, they emit a musty smell. This smell is a reliable Argentine ant identification feature.

Argentine ants are attracted to sweet substances and can invade homes for food, becoming a significant nuisance.

Due to their large colony size and multiple nesting sites, controlling Argentine ants can be challenging. Effective management often involves a combination of methods, including baiting, eliminating access to food and water sources, and sealing entry points into buildings.

Professional pest control services are often necessary for severe infestations. Regular monitoring and maintenance are crucial for long-term control and prevention.

Pharaoh Ants

Pharaoh ants, Monomorium pharaonis, are notorious indoor ants that are difficult to control due to their ability to spread rapidly.

Pharaoh Ants - Common house ants

Size

  • Length: A pharaoh ant is relatively small, typically measuring about 1/16 inch (1.5 to 2 mm) in length.

Shape

  • Body Structure: They have a slender, oval-shaped body.
  • Antennae: Their antennae consist of 12 segments and end in a 3-segmented club.
  • Node: They have a distinct, two-segmented petiole (the connector between the thorax and abdomen).

Color

  • Appearance: Pharaoh ants are light yellow to red, with darker abdomens.

Origin and Habitat

  • Origins: Thought to be native to Africa, Pharaoh ants are present throughout the world, particularly in buildings in temperate climates.
  • Habitat Preferences: They are primarily an indoor species, thriving in heated buildings and rarely seen outdoors in colder climates.

Activity Patterns

  • Most Active: These ants can remain active indoors year-round, especially in heated environments.
  • Foraging Behavior: Pharaoh ants forage for food in long ant trails and are known for their ability to find food sources quickly.

Nesting and Colonization

  • Nesting Sites: Inside buildings, they often nest in warm, humid areas near food and water sources. Common nesting sites include wall voids, behind baseboards, insulation, and under floors or appliances.
  • Colonies: Pharaoh ant colonies tend to be large, with several hundred to several thousand workers and multiple queens. They are known for their ‘budding’ behavior, where a portion of the colony splits to form new colonies, rapidly spreading throughout a building.

Identifying Features

  • Budding: Their ability to create new nests through budding makes them particularly difficult to eradicate.
  • Diet: They are attracted to various foods, especially sweet and fatty substances.

Pharaoh ants are a significant pest problem, especially in hospitals, nursing homes, and other healthcare facilities, where they can spread pathogens and contaminate sterile environments.

Their preference for nesting in hard-to-reach areas makes them particularly challenging to control. Traditional insecticides often cause colonies to bud and spread, exacerbating the problem.

Therefore, baiting strategies use slow-acting poisons to allow worker ants to carry the bait back to the nest. The bait can kill ants and the entire colony if the ants in the nest consume it.

Professional pest control is often necessary for severe infestations. Preventive measures include meticulous sanitation, eliminating moisture sources, and sealing potential entry points.

Crazy Ants

Two types of crazy ants invade homes – the “Tawny Crazy Ant,” Nylanderia fulva, and the “Rasberry Crazy Ant,” Paratrechina longicornis.

The most recognizable feature of crazy ants is their erratic movement while crawling.

Yellow Crazy Ants

Size

  • Length: Crazy ants are relatively small, typically measuring about 1/8 inch (3 to 4 mm) in length.

Shape

  • Body Structure: They have a slender, elongated body with long legs and antennae.
  • Antennae: Their antennae are long, with 12 segments and no distinct club.
  • Node: They have a single, inconspicuous node on their petiole.

Color

  • Appearance: Tawny Crazy ants are reddish-brown or yellow, while Rasberry Crazy ants are dark brown to black.

Origin and Habitat

  • Origins: Both species are considered invasive in the United States. Tawny Crazy ants are native to South America, while Rasberry Crazy ants originated in Asia or Africa.
  • Habitat Preferences: They are adaptable to various environments but prefer moist areas. They are often found in large numbers outdoors in soil, under objects, or in rotting wood and can infiltrate homes and buildings.

Activity Patterns

  • Most Active: They are particularly active during warmer months but can maintain activity indoors during cooler periods.
  • Foraging Behavior: Known for their rapid, erratic movement, they forage far from their nests and can travel along tight, irregular trails or in no apparent pattern.

Nesting and Colonization

  • Nesting Sites: Indoors, they nest in wall voids, under carpeting, or in other hidden areas. Outdoors, they often form nests in soil, moss, under objects, or in rotting wood.
  • Colonies: Colonies are usually large and can contain numerous queens, allowing for rapid population growth. They are also known for forming supercolonies.

Identifying Features

  • Movement: The “crazy” foraging behavior, characterized by rapid and seemingly random movement, is a key identifier.
  • Electrical Equipment: They are notorious for invading electrical equipment, including laptops, and causing short circuits, possibly attracted by the warmth or the electrical fields.

Crazy ants primarily set up the ant colony outdoors before moving indoors. These ants are nuisance ants that invade homes in large numbers.

Infestation indoors primarily begins when a random ant with no ant trail enters homes to find a food source. Other ants follow by tracing the pheromone trails the single ant leaves behind.

Their nesting habits make them build multiple nests outdoors and indoors. A severe infestation can be challenging to eliminate, given their numbers.

Effective crazy ant control strategies include exclusion, baiting, habitat elimination, and insecticide sprays.

Acrobat Ants

Acrobat ants belong to the genus Crematogaster. They got their names for their unique ability to raise their abdomens over their thoraxes, like earwigs, when threatened.

Acrobat Ants

Size

  • Length: Acrobat ants vary in size but are generally small to medium-sized, typically measuring about 1/8 to 3/16 inch (3 to 5 mm) in length.

Shape

  • Body Structure: They have a distinctive heart-shaped abdomen, particularly noticeable from above.
  • Antennae: Their antennae comprise 11 segments and end in a 3-segmented club.
  • Node: They have a single, distinct node on their petiole, contributing to their unique abdomen-raising ability.

Color

  • Appearance: Acrobat ants range in color from yellowish-brown to dark brown, and some species may have a darker gaster (abdomen).

Origin and Habitat

  • Origins: Acrobat ants are found worldwide, with various species adapted to different climates and environments.
  • Habitat Preferences: They typically nest outdoors in moist environments, often in rotting wood, under rocks, or in tree stumps. They are also known to occupy abandoned nests of other insects, like termites or carpenter ants.

Activity Patterns

  • Most Active: These ants are most active during warmer months.
  • Foraging Behavior: Acrobat ants forage for food in trails and are known to feed on various substances, including sweets, proteins, and other insects.

Nesting and Colonization

  • Nesting Sites: Indoors, they may nest in moisture-damaged wood, within wall voids, or around windows and door frames. Outdoors, their preference for decaying wood, can lead them to nest in tree limbs, stumps, or logs.
  • Colonies: Colony sizes can vary but are typically moderate in size. They can have multiple queens, which aids in their ability to establish new colonies.

Identifying Features

  • Abdomen Movement: Their ability to acrobatically raise their abdomen over their body is a key identifying feature.
  • Odor: When disturbed, they may emit a repellant, unpleasant odor as a defense mechanism.

Acrobat ants invade homes, often as a result of existing moisture damage or decay in wood structures.

While they do not cause the same level of damage as carpenter ants or termites, their presence can indicate other structural issues.

Eliminating acrobat ant infestations involves addressing the moisture problems that attract them, sealing entry points to prevent access, and using ant baits.

As with many ant species, maintaining a clean environment with limited access to food and water sources helps prevent infestations.

Ghost Ants

Ghost Ants

Ghost ants, with the scientific name as Tapinoma melanocephalum, got their names because of their pale coloration and small size, which make them difficult to see.

Size

  • Length: Ghost ants are tiny, typically measuring about 1/16 inch (1.5 mm) in length.

Shape

  • Body Structure: They have a thin, delicate body with a distinct head, thorax, and abdomen.
  • Antennae: Their antennae consist of 12 segments and do not have a clubbed end.
  • Node: They have a single, indistinct node on their petiole.

Color

  • Appearance: Ghost ants have a unique coloration; their head and thorax are dark, almost black, while their abdomen and legs are pale, almost translucent, giving them their ghostly appearance.

Origin and Habitat

  • Origins: They’re from tropical Asia and are widespread in many subtropical and tropical regions.
  • Habitat Preferences: They prefer warm and humid environments and are commonly found both indoors and outdoors in such conditions.

Activity Patterns

  • Most Active: They are active year-round in warm climates but may become less visible during colder periods.
  • Foraging Behavior: Ghost ants are known for quickly locating and exploiting food sources, often following trails to sweets and oils.

Nesting and Colonization

  • Nesting Sites: Indoors, they often nest in small spaces, such as between books, in wall voids, under appliances, or in potted plants. Outdoors, they nest in the soil, under stones, or in dead wood.
  • Colonies: Colonies are usually small to moderate but can spread widely through budding, where a few workers and a queen break away from the main colony to start a new nesting site.

Identifying Features

  • Coloration: The contrasting colors of their body parts make them distinctive among ant species.
  • Trail Formation: They form tight, well-defined trails, which can help locate their nests.

Ghost ants are nuisance pests indoors. These ants feed on sweet substances and beverage spillovers and can contaminate foods.

Control of ghost ant infestations typically involves locating and treating nests directly, combined with sanitation measures to eliminate food and water sources. Baiting strategies can also be effective.

However, complete eradication can be challenging due to their tendency to form multiple satellite colonies. Professional pest control services are necessary in cases of severe or widespread infestation.

Grease Ants

Grease ants, or thief ants, belong to the genus Solenopsis. These ants prefer greasy and fatty foods, which is the basis of their common name.

Grease Ants

Size

  • Length: Grease ants are among the smallest household ants, measuring about 1/16 inch (1.5 mm) or less in length.

Shape

  • Body Structure: They have a slender, elongated body with a relatively small head and thorax compared to their abdomen.
  • Antennae: Their antennae are rather long and consist of 10 segments, ending in a 2-segmented club.
  • Node: They possess a two-segmented petiole.

Color

  • Appearance: Grease ants are usually light yellow to brown.

Origin and Habitat

  • Origins: These ants are widespread and can be found in various regions worldwide.
  • Habitat Preferences: They prefer to nest in hidden, protected areas. Outdoors, they are often found under rocks or inside decaying wood. Indoors, they can nest in wall voids, under floors, or behind counters.

Activity Patterns

  • Most Active: Their activity peaks in warmer months, but indoor nests can remain active year-round.
  • Foraging Behavior: Known for their affinity for greasy, fatty, and protein-rich foods, they often follow trails to sources of such food.

Nesting and Colonization

  • Nesting Sites: Indoors they often establish nests near sources of food, especially in kitchen areas. Their small size allows them to access very tiny cracks and crevices.
  • Colonies: Grease ant colonies are typically small but can grow significantly over time, especially if they have access to abundant food sources.

Identifying Features

  • Diet Preference: Their strong preference for greasy and oily foods is a key identifying trait.
  • Size: Their tiny size distinguishes them from many other ants in the house.

Grease ants are considered a nuisance in homes, particularly in kitchens where they invade food storage areas. 

Their small size allows them to infiltrate packaged foods and access hard-to-reach areas easily. 

Controlling grease ant infestations involves meticulous sanitation to remove food sources, sealing entry points to prevent access, and using appropriate baiting techniques.

Areas In The House That Ants Target

Ant infestations in the home primarily begin from areas that have high moisture content and food wastes.

So, places like kitchen, bathroom, and basement are the common areas where ants initially build their colonies.

However, this is not set to stone.

Ant infestations can also begin from the bedroom if the bedroom has food wastes, moisture, wall voids, and damp wood.

Slowly, as the infestation grows, ants start to expand their colonies. And they spread in most areas of the house.

Winged carpenter ants can directly enter areas that are not damp and without food wastes. These ants will mate, lose their wings, and drill into the wooden structures to lay their eggs.

Flying ants or winged ants don’t bite. But they can if you try to handle them or if they get pressed against your skin.

Ants from outdoor areas, such as yard or garden, can also sneak inside places like your garage.

From your garage, these ants get inside cars and cause damages.

The ant problem isn’t limited to free standing individual homes. Apartments can also have severe ant infestations.

Ants in apartment complexes spread from one infested apartment to another. And they don’t limit themselves only to the ground or lower floor apartments.

Ants can infest apartments situated at the third floor and above!

Ants travel from one apartment to another through ducts, pipes, electrical wirings, and, as usual, through the gaps on the windows, doors, and walls.

Final Thoughts on Common Household Ants

Ants in the house are the result of moisture, food wastes, outdoor infestations, and easy entry points on windows, windowsills, doors, and walls.

These ants invade homes for food and shelter. And they will build their nests or colonies in the house.

The key to prevent ants is exclusion, which is to remove all the sources that draw ants.

A home with ant infestations can have multiple ant nests spread out in different areas of the house. Hiring a pest controller is your best bet to eliminate severe ant infestations in the house.

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